Neil (nt) wrote,
Neil
nt

I spent the weekend visiting my father. We left Saturday morning, driving through the foothills to Pincher Creek, then east to Lethbridge. This is far from the quickest route (actually, it doubled the length of the journey), but it was worth it for the scenery. The sun came out shortly after we left Calgary, highlighting the late autumn colors. I wish I could have photographed much of what I saw, but it is difficult to stop if there is traffic, and even without traffic, by the time the car has stopped, the view is gone. I did manage to stop to photograph Big Rock, a giant glacial erratic near Okotoks.

Big Rock

Dad's new apartment is in a nice, fairly new building. It is a one-bedroom apartment, with a fairly spacious kitchen and dining area. There is a large, screened-in balcony. He has settled in comfortably, with furniture and paintings from his old house. He held garage sales to get rid of a lot of stuff from the house, and still had two truckloads to donate to the Salvation Army at the end. He had lived in that house for 55 years.

I drove past the old house on Sunday morning while he was at church. It looked unchanged, except that there were different cars in the driveway and Halloween decorations in the front window.

Dad is well, but is getting old. He seemed a bit stiff and stooped, having some difficulty getting into and out of the car. Overall, he is in decent shape, considering he will be turning 84 later this month. We went for a walk of a couple of miles in the coulees, and he was fine with that. It was surprisingly mild for the time of year, but overcast and dark. I took the picture below, which I have posterized.

Tree

I brought five photo albums back with me to be scanned. They go from around 1920 through the 1970s. What I had scanned earlier were mainly old photos of my Dad's family; this lot includes photos from my mother's family, as well as photos of our family growing up. I will post some as I work on scanning them.

It is interesting looking through these albums now. I'm sure I saw them when I was younger, but many of them I don't remember, or they meant little to me at the time. Now I see more in them. "Every picture tells a story," as the saying goes. You can see a lot in expressions, body language, clothing, settings. I can understand much better the story of my parent's lives, and of my own. The genealogical work my brother has been doing helps make sense of these albums, too.
Subscribe

  • (no subject)

    In Calgary, Exploring the Cultural Side of ‘Cowtown’ (link is to The New York Times) Pretty good article, although I've never seen Calgarians…

  • Broken trees

    A few examples of trees broken by the accumulation of snow, as mentioned in my last post. The snow is gone, but the damage remains.

  • (no subject)

    I drove around town today and was shocked at the number of trees that had been damaged by the heavy snowfall earlier in the week. It's too early in…

  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic
  • 4 comments